Category Archives: Remodel Alerts

Woman Files Lawsuit, Contractor Fails to Remodel House

GALVESTON – Catherine Gardiner has filed a lawsuit.  Complaining a local contractor took her money.  Then failed to work on her Brenham home.

Her charges are.  Friendswood resident Phil Messarra, doing business as Master Craftsmen, “engaged in false, misleading or deceptive acts or practices.” Court papers filed Aug. 9 in Galveston County Court at Law No. 2 say.

Gardiner hired the defendant to undertake a remodeling job.  His representations were “that he had the skill, knowledge, experience, expertise, financial wherewithal, staff and personnel” for the subject project.

The suit, however, claims.  The remodeling contractor allowed said project to drag on “for over seven months.  This is well past the promised time of completion.”

It adds that he spent funds and time allotted to the plaintiff’s order on other work.

The plaintiff states she wrote him a demand letter dated June 3.  But the “issues and deficiencies raised in that correspondence remained after six weeks following the letter.  They still remain to this day.”

“The defendant has had more than enough time to address and remedy these serious matters,” the original petition says.

“Unfortunately, the defendant has wholly failed to do so.”

“Numerous” breaches prompted Gardiner to terminate Messarra.

She insists the defendant’s supposed actions led to the loss of property value.

A jury trial is requested.

Attorney Douglas A. McAninch with Douglas A. McAninch P.C. in Friendswood is representing the plaintiff, and Galveston County Court at Law No. 2 Judge Barbara Roberts is presiding over the case.

Cause No. 68,040

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

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All along the water tower:Tom Dixon’s sky-high townhouse

About Matt Hickman

Eco-living expert blogs about best ways to go green at home.

MNN.COM

Summer Olympics-bound Airbnb’ers take note: It appears that there’s currently room available in one of west London’s most unique properties — a 60-foot-tall converted water tower residence.

Thu, Jul 19 2012 at 9:00 AM EST

 

Tom Dixon's converted water tower home in west London                       Image: © David Hawgood under Creative Commons Licence.
Just when I thought I had officially retired my “All along the water tower” series, along comes another eye-catching instance of a decommissioned elongated water storage container transformed into a stair-heavy private residence (hat tip to Mark Boyer over at Inhabitat). And this repurposed water tower dwelling located in North Kensington, London, couldn’t pop up at a better time as it includes three private rooms for rent via Airbnb starting at $209 per night. Perfect for Summer Olympics lodgings, am I right? And, somewhat surprisingly, it looks like there’s vacancies during the Games!
The West London water tower home is actually owned by Tom Dixon, the lauded British furniture designer who recently unleashed thousands of somewhat hideous orange Flouro Bags across New York City during NY Design Week (anyone want mine?). Dixon purchased the redundant, 60-foot-tall water tower and the surrounding land on Landsbroke Grove back in 2005 — once upon a time, the concrete tank within the 1930s-era structure stored 5,000 gallons of water to be used if a nearby gasometer ever went up in flames — and since 2009, he’s been working alongside sustainable architectural firm SUSD to transform it into one of west London’s most dizzying examples of adaptive reuse. And although the structure offers knockout panoramic views of the city, Dixon himself has no plans to actually move in according to The Daily Mail.
Dixon’s converted water tower home currently offers three floors of living space — three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen, and a reception area — that have been “fitted out to meet the highest eco-friendly standards” and are linked by an interior spiral staircase. In the near future, Dixon intends to remove the rooftop terrace, plop on another two stories, and then reinstate the roof deck. Once the £400,000 addition is completed, the home will offer a total of 5,000-square-feet of living space. An elevator that will move not-so-able-bodied visitors from street level to the first story is also in the works (currently, reaching the first floor involves hiking up six flights of stairs). And, last but not least, the next phase of development will include the installation of a heat exchange system that will cool the building using water pumped from the nearby Grand Union Canal.
Peter Harris of SUSD tells the Daily Mail that getting the green light to transform the elevated reservoir into a home was not nearly as big of issue as the complex engineering challenges involved with the conversion. “The local council got behind the idea from the start. They wanted to keep the tower as a landmark structure to mark the entry to the borough. We received no objections from local residents.” Harris adds that even though Dixon himself won’t be taking up residence in the tower, he wanted to “to create something using this great local landmark — to build a townhouse in the sky.”
Head on over to the property’s Airbnb page to view plenty of more photos and learn more about the amenities included when staying in a converted water tower dwelling owned by a super-famous British designer (no parties, no pets, and no smoking, folks). In addition to the obvious, they’re really pushing the fact that there’s a Sainsbury’s supermarket right next door. For some reason, I’m guessing that hauling huge bags of groceries six flights of stairs would get a touch tiresome after a while.

 

Via [The Daily Mail] via [Inhabitat]

 Looks like Matt fell into something really interesting.  What do you think?  Post your opinion and ideas in the comment section.  Fill out a registration form to get all the juicy updates.

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

 

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

 

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If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

 

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

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NARI Experts Exterior Renovations Best Return on Investment

Milwaukee/NARI Experts Identify Exterior Home Renovations with Best Return on Investment

By Dave Amoroso

July 20, 2012 | 0 comments

On local exterior remodels, homeowners focus on seeing the greatest return on investment, according to members of the Milwaukee/NARI Home Improvement Council, Inc., the area’s leading home improvement and remodeling resource for 51 years. Though the trend is evident in all aspects of remodeling, outdoor projects especially are viewed in terms of getting back what’s put in – and with good reason.
With a return of 73%, replacing steel entry doors has the highest ROI of any remodel according to Remodeling Magazine’s 2012 Cost vs. Value Report. In fact, seven of the top ten are exterior remodels, including garage doors, vinyl siding, wood and vinyl window replacement, and wood and composite deck additions.
Because each home and situation is different, the type of project with the best return “depends on what the homeowner is trying to achieve,” said Josh Meldman of JM Remodeling and Construction of Brown Deer.
To Lower Energy Costs One way to get back remodeling dollars is by lowering energy costs. This is most effective if the homeowners plan to stay in their home for the long term. If this is the case, Meldman felt that new energy efficient windows and doors are the best bet.
Patrick Rogo of BCI Exteriors in Menomonee Falls agreed, adding, “Windows, doors, and attic insulation will give homeowners the fastest way to recoup their initial investment, and over time those projects will pay for themselves.”
How much will homeowners save? In the case of windows, replacing single pane windows with energy efficient double- or triple-paned windows can drop heating and cooling bills an average of 20 to 30 percent. It will vary based on the quality of the old windows, members said.
Insulated siding also will pay for itself according to Rogo, but it will take more time to do so.
To Be Maintenance Free “A good exterior investment for homeowners is anything that makes the exterior of the house low maintenance or maintenance free,” Meldman said. “This can be any composite material such as fibercement and engineered wood, or fully synthetic materials such as vinyl siding and windows. Also aluminum trim installed over the existing wood trim on the house is a very popular option for many homeowners.”
“Siding, soffit, and fascia allow you to appreciate the beauty of your home and require little to no maintenance,” Rogo said. “Also roofing is a project many homeowners don’t appreciate fully until after it’s done.” He has found that replacing the roof provides peace of mind that a homeowner’s largest investment is protected.
Having low maintenance was an important factor in a recent remodel by Chamberlin Co. in Wauwatosa. Company owner Tim Nolan explained, “We did an asbestos slate roofing and siding tear off. The reason the customer did the work was for low maintenance, to get rid of the asbestos, and to have an updated look for the house.” They accomplished this with new roofing, vinyl siding, aluminum trim work around the windows and overhangs, gutters, and aluminum storm windows.
To Sell The Home Decks are another area of the home that can produce a high return on investment. The cost of replacing or adding a deck to a home depends a lot on building materials. Milwaukee/NARI members suggest building a deck that matches seamlessly with the house, while choosing materials and sealants that will help your outdoor living area stand out to prospective buyers.
Windows that save energy are always a selling point. As Nolan pointed out, the look of the windows matters too. “You can enjoy the looks and comfort of new maintenance free vinyl windows. They come in a variety of exterior colors and interior wood grains,” he said.
Curb appeal isn’t all about looks, members warn. Buyers want a home that’s trouble-free, especially with regard to the roof. “When homeowners are in transition and looking to sell within the next couple of years, having a new roof installed is best for resale purposes,” Meldman said. “Nowadays buyers always want to know the condition of the roof, and if there’s any question about the integrity of the roof, it ends up either being a deal breaker or the sale goes under negotiations, which can be a long drawn out and stressful process for both parties.”
At BCI Exteriors, the projects done for resale aren’t always roofs. Rogo said, “Siding, soffit, and fascia are the most common projects we’ve done to help homeowners sell their home. We’re often told after the project that the homeowners wish they had done it earlier so they could enjoy the ‘like new’ home before they sell it. Roofing would be a close second.”
Nolan agreed that it’s essential to fix a roof in need of repair, but what if homeowners just want something fast and easy for their exterior? Consider improving the front entry of the home with a little color, he said. “The easiest project would be a new aluminum storm door for the front of the house,” Nolan said.
To Save On The Remodel For homeowners looking to save money on a costly remodel, Meldman said, “The most inexpensive product in the low maintenance market is vinyl. If budgeting is the homeowners’ biggest concern, this is the product for them.”
For homeowners looking for inexpensive exterior remodels, Rogo said, “Our least expensive projects are general repairs, gutters, leaf protection, and attic insulation. Gutters and leaf protection allow our homeowners to stay safer at home by staying off their ladders and saving them time.” Homeowners have seen a return from state and federal energy saving incentive programs, specifically with regard to windows and attic insulation, Rogo said. “These programs come and go, and most of the time homeowners don’t know about them until it’s too late. It’s important to speak to a knowledgeable contractor who will help you get the best return on your investment.”
Meldman added, “It’s always good to do your research and choose a professional contractor that is sensitive to your needs and plans. A good contractor will help you choose the products best suited for you.”

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

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Handy home improvement websites to simplify life for DIY-ers

6:20 AM, Jul 20, 2012

Written by

USA Today

Owning a home is both a blessing and a curse. It’s nice to have a place to call your own and to fill it with things you love. On the other hand, there’s no denying that it requires you to give entire weekends over to do-it-yourself projects, cleaning and otherwise protecting your sizable investment.

I’m sure you can think of a dozen things that need to be done at your house right now. From cleaning out gutters to fixing drippy faucets, it never seems to end.

The good news is that, thanks to the Internet, you no longer need to be overwhelmed. I’ve selected some websites that will help you become smarter and more efficient about home maintenance. They may even help you reclaim a few of those lost weekends.

Personal Color Viewer: Inside or out, painting your home is a major burden. We’ve all seen houses painted colors that were poorly chosen … sometimes we wonder if an extended trip to the bar was involved before the paint-buying began.

How many times have you gone to the paint store, returned home and taped a mishmash of color samples to the wall? Then, after a few days of painful indecision, you pick a color. You head back to the paint store to buy a quart, drive home and brush it on – and it doesn’t look anything like you expected!

This website brings paint selection into the 21st century. You can download stock photos of houses or, even better, actual photos of your own home. You’ll see the colors displayed on your home’s exterior or on the walls of the room you are painting. Once you make an informed choice, you’ll print out the color codes and head to the store, ready to buy and get started.

How to Clean Anything: Dust happens. The need to clean is never going away. Fortunately, cleaning is more time-consuming than difficult – most of the time.

Once in a while, though, you run into a stain or an odor that mocks your most vigorous efforts. When that happens, visit this site (www.howtocleananything.com). As its name promises, it will tell you the best methods and tools to clean anything, from your makeup brushes to your barbecue grill.

HomeSpotHQ: When life becomes crazy, it’s easy for home maintenance to fall by the wayside. Or in a flurry of cleaning, you might have thrown out the manuals for your appliances.

This site (www.homespothq.com) tackles both problems; it’s like a control center for your house.

It stores important manuals, part numbers and paint colors. The site also helps you schedule important maintenance tasks and plan improvement projects. Need to hunt down a part or supplies for your project? HomeSpot can even point you to the best deals in your neighborhood.

Roomle: Rearranging furniture can make a room seem fresh again. However, it can take a toll on your back when you try several layouts and none of them work.

This site (www.roomle.com) helps you create a floorplan and fill it up with virtual furniture. Move pieces around until you find just the right arrangement – all without breaking a sweat or scratching your grand piano. Click a button to see your design modeled in 3D. You can also post the image to Facebook and get feedback from your friends.

DIYorNot: Can you save money by doing that remodeling project yourself? Not always.

This site (diyornot.com) gives you an estimated cost and timescale for any project. It also offers thousands of tutorials so you can see the effort that a potential project will require.

You might decide that a professional will cost less, in both money and aggravation, in the long run. On the other hand, it might give you the confidence you need to tackle it all by yourself.

EnergySavers: Your home uses a lot of energy to keep you cool in summer, warm in winter, provide you with hot water and to power all your home electronics. Making your home more energy efficient can result in significant savings for the long term.

This site (www.energysavers.gov/your_home), hosted by the Department of Energy, walks you through a do-it-yourself energy audit to help pinpoint where your home might be leaking dollars. Then you can read up on how to install insulation, apply sun shading film or tackle other easy-to-do energy-saving projects.

By Kim Komando

USA Today

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

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Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank. 

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

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Budget your kitchen or bathroom remodel

Project: Home

By SEAN MURPHY-Correspondentchicoer.com
Posted:   07/20/2012 12:58:57 AM PDT
A kitchen remodeling job is shown in this undated contributed photo. Making changes to a kitchen…
If you’re a homeowner, you’ll almost certainly remodel a kitchen or bathroom. Whether you’re replacing a kitchen faucet or building a bathroom from scratch, you can easily spend too much. So, when it comes to saving time and money, be sure you’re thorough with your planning.Saving money is a prime reason why we choose to do projects ourselves. And while saving on expenses might seem challenging during a time like this, little things can add up and make your life a whole lot easier. For example, be flexible in your plans. For the most part things will work out according to plan, but things will come up. Whether it’s an unexpected delay, a product or service that’s going to cost WAY more than you thought, or something else, try your best to offset any delays with continuous work on another part of your remodel. That way, when you’re ready to return to the plan, you’re still right on schedule (or darn near close to it).

Also, haul the old stuff (like a toilet, sink, or lighting fixture) out yourself if you can. Hiring someone to remove your old fixtures is an unnecessary expense. In fact, if you have the vehicle, team up with another household and save a trip to the dump to save even more money. Don’t get in over your head before seeking help from a professional contractor. This is easier said than done and is noticeable only after the fact. Be aware of what you’re getting yourself into, and don’t be afraid to ask for (professional) help.That about covers the larger remodel problems and concerns homeowners have.

Here are some quick-hit tips that can also help the planning process:

Plan and budget

When filling out your product wish list, plan the entire project from start to finish, including what materials you’ll need and what you expect to pay for them.

Shop smart

Comparing brick-and-mortar stores with online stores will ensure that you find the best price.

Accessorize

What would your kitchen or bathroom be without accessories and accents? They can help complete a theme or decor in a single room or the entire house. How about coordinating a kitchen soap dispenser with a towel bar in the master bathroom?

Start small

If you’re on a shoestring budget, replacement parts can do the trick until you’re comfortable enough to purchase the latest design styles.

Be resourceful

When you can, save even more money by searching discount websites. Planning a room remodel is a definite challenge, but abiding by a few easy-to-follow tips can really simplify matters. Doing a remodel yourself can be incredibly rewarding, so make sure it’s done right.

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

 

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

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Wrong turn led to right home in Shorewood

At Home With…

Jay and Laura Sorensen

Michael Sears

The Sorensens are: (back row, from left) twin sons Anton and Aleksei, both 16; and Jay; (front row) Laura and daughter Annika, 12.

Wood and multicolored painting scheme brighten interior

By Jackie Loohauis-Bennett of the Journal Sentinel
July 20, 2012

The Sorensen family of Shorewood lives in a home made happy by wood.

Jay, wife Laura, twin sons Anton and Aleksei, 16, and daughter Annika, 12, relax in the warm light cast from oak and pine floors, built-ins and moldings.

And then there’s the 100-year-old silver maple that stands sentinel in their backyard.

It’s almost as if the wood gives off a sense of gratitude for the care that Jay and Laura provide. When the couple bought the 1921 house in 1992, it was what Laura describes as “an ‘other-house.’ Not a farmhouse, not a Colonial, not a bungalow, not an Arts and Crafts. An ‘other.’ ”

That meant that the Sorensens weren’t limited to one decorating style, but the interior woodwork was also “other” than what they wanted. “Every stick of inside trim was once covered in seven layers of paint,” says Jay.

Are we finished?

The couple’s original idea was to simply strip the built-in china cabinet in the dining room and leave the rest of the woodwork painted. But then, says Laura: “I was on my back stripping the built-in and I started crying. It was so beautiful, and everything else was white.”

That’s when the refinishing campaign really started. “The plan was to strip the first floor, but it looked horrible so we did the upstairs, too,” says Jay.

Refinishing pitfalls included rotten 70-year-old trim that had to be replaced; the couple searched the area to find matching lumber. But the result, after three years of stripping and staining, was a 2,100-square-foot home filled with amazing woodwork.

Sweet treat

Outside, more beloved wood welcomes guests to the Sorensen home. That giant silver maple, one of the largest in Wisconsin, “defines the backyard,” says Jay. The tree has been gently cared for, trimmed and cabled to keep its branches from splitting. Jay taps it every spring and its sap, which is made into maple syrup, provides pancake toppings for family breakfasts.

Laura happily gardens around the great tree’s shade and roots, using containers for her flowers. A wooden pergola with slate floor and hanging lights creates a space in the backyard that’s great for entertaining.

But caring for wood wasn’t the only task that the Sorensens faced when they bought their home. Luckily, Jay, president of the IdeaWorks Company airline consulting firm, is also a self-taught handyman who finished many of the jobs himself, including wiring, carpentry and plumbing.

One of the major projects was upgrading the electric fireplace into a fully functioning natural and gas fireplace. “In the 1920s homeowners were switching to central heating, so to celebrate they’d put in fake fireplaces with electric logs. We wanted a real fireplace,” says Jay. He put in marble finishing around the fireplace to accent the vintage built-in cabinets that flank it.

Color coordinated

Laura, a classically trained pianist and a teacher at Indian Hills Elementary School, felt she wanted professional decorating help after she failed at her attempt to paint the dining room walls an acceptable color. “I’m color challenged,” she says.

The decorator repainted the dining room a deep rusty red, painted the then-mustard kitchen an off-white, and an upstairs bedroom buttercup yellow.

The house also needed more work to make room for the growing Sorensen family. A previous owner had built an extension that included a family room that opened into the kitchen and an extended area in Annika’s bedroom. Laura and Jay knew the family would need more bathroom space, so they made two enlarged bathrooms from one, “stealing space” from an original bedroom, closet and hallway.

Jay took on more remodeling, including removing a “useless” linen cabinet at the top of the second-floor stairs and replacing it with a linen cabinet he built. Together the couple tackled less-than-perfect plastered ceilings in upstairs bedrooms by covering them with Anaglypta wall coverings – a thick material with an embossed pattern that can be painted.

Today all major remodeling is done, and the house boasts a family room, living room, formal dining room, kitchen and half-bath on the first floor. The second floor holds two bathrooms and three bedrooms. The finished basement has an office and a sewing room with space for exercise equipment.

Laura and Jay took some time recently to talk more about their home.

Q.How did you choose this house to buy?

Laura: We made a wrong turn. We knew we wanted a fixer-upper with a dining room and at least three bedrooms. We made a wrong turn when we were looking for houses one day and saw a “For Sale by Owner” sign. After the walk-through we knew: “This is more than a starter home. This is the one.”

Q.Jay, how did you become such a handyman?

Jay: I’m not sure. I have been somewhat mystified by it myself. My dad would show me how to fix stuff, but we never had projects as involved as I got into. We had a workbench at home and I would mess around on it. I love watching “This Old House.” I guess I’m just naturally inclined to do things with my hands. I’m a national park junkie so this summer I’m taking the boys out to North Cascades National Park in Washington and we’re going to be renovating a ranger cabin. I will enjoy the work because I enjoy teaching my sons how to paint, drywall and plumb. They’re going to enjoy it.

Q.How would you describe the style of decorating in your house?

Laura: “Traditional Comfortable.” I don’t want it to be a museum piece. I want it to be a place where you can plop down on a chair and have a glass of wine.

Q. Describe the color palette you used.

Laura: Each room is different, but basically earth tones: deep green in the foyer, teal in the living room, deep rose in the dining room. I wanted color. I wasn’t afraid of color.

Q.How would you describe your home’s personality?

Laura: It’s a happy home. When he was in third grade Aleksei wrote a poem about it: “I hear the laughter in the living room/ I smell the bread in the kitchen . . . ” We love having friends and family over. We can always find something to celebrate.

Q.Do you have a favorite piece of furniture or art in the house?

Jay: The wooden shelf with carved leaves and grape clusters. There’s a story in my family that there was a Russian count on my father’s side of the family who carved this.

Laura: The built-in oak cabinets that flank the fireplace. That’s what cinched the house for me.

Q.What advice do you have for anyone remodeling an older home?

Laura: Realize that an older home always needs something done for it. Also, come up with a timeline for remodeling or it never gets done. We decided on a couple of months for the dining room and we got up at 7 a.m. and would work on it until 10 p.m. Also, do your remodeling room by room. Don’t have the whole house as a construction zone.

Jackie has put together a great article.  What would you like to also have learned from this article?  Just ask in the comment section 

Information on bathroom remodeling in  upcomming posts.

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

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